Celebrating Black History in Granville

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During the year there will be several presentations throughout Granville in observance of Black History:

The Richard H. Thornton Library & Granville Library System will host a number of events in downtown Oxford:

motown

On February 18th there will be a Discussion by Biff Hollingsworth of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill from 1 pm to 3 pm.  
And, from 3 pm to 5 pm there will a Discussion and Musical Performance by gospel singer Mary Williams.

On February 19th there will be a presentation on "Motown, Black Excellence, and High Negro Style" by Dr. Mark Neal of Duke University from 4 pm to 5 pm.  CLICK HERE for more information.

On February 23rd & 24th there will be a Month in Review by Eddie McCoy from 3 pm to 5 pm.  Special guest are planned for both reviews.

On February 25th there will be a presentation by Dr. Timothy B. Tyson, author of 'Blood Done Signed My Name' from 2 pm to 5 pm.

On February 27th from 5:30 pm to 6:30 pm there will be a presentation on Women in the Civil Rights Movement.  Dr. Katherine Charron will speak on mini-biographies of women in the Montgomery Bus Boycott as well as Ella Baker, Septima Clark and Fannie Lou Hamer.  CLICK HERE for more information.

Exhibits at Richard H. Thornton library will also be available to the public every Friday, Saturday and Sunday beginning at 1 pm, except for February 8th, 10th and 18th.  

civilAll programs are free and open to the public. For more information please contact Eddie McCoy at 919-693-9261 or CLICK HERE.  For other programming sponsored by Granville Public Library, contact Carly Cox, Adult Services at 919-693-1121.

 

 

 

 


 

railroad“Historical Notes on the African American Contribution to the Railroad Industry in North Carolina”
Presenter:  Ms. Sallyann Marable Hobson

Date & Time:  Saturday, March 17, 2018  @ 3:00 pm
Location:  G. C. Shaw Museum, 202 E. McClanahan Street, Oxford, NC


Who built the first railroad through Granville County, NC?  What is a Gandy Dancer? The answer to these questions and historical information on the  contributions made by African Americans to southern railroads will be discussed in this hour long talk. From the days of forced labor to employment with the Pullman Company, the work of African Americans kept the trains rolling and played a significant role in our nation’s transportation history.